How to write a research poster

By Dr Nick Oswald Poster presentations are a great way to show off your hard work, especially if you are just starting out in research. They are much less stressful than oral presentations, but still provide great networking opportunities and valuable practice at talking about your work.

How to write a research poster

This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Posters are a key component of communicating your science and an important element in a successful scientific career. Posters, while delivering the same high-quality science, offer a different medium from either oral presentations [ 1 ] or published papers [ 2 ], and should be treated accordingly.

Posters should be considered a snapshot of your work intended to engage colleagues in a dialog about the work, or, if you are not present, to be a summary that will encourage the reader to want to learn more.

Once I have decided what to include, how do I actually design my poster?

Many a lifelong collaboration [ 3 ] has begun in front of a poster board. Here are ten simple rules for maximizing the return on the time-consuming process of preparing and presenting an effective poster.

Define the Purpose The purpose will vary depending on the status and nature of the work being presented, as well as the intent. Some posters are designed to be used again and again; for example, those making conference attendees aware of a shared resource.

Others will likely be used once at a conference and then be relegated to the wall in the laboratory. Before you start preparing the poster, ask yourself the following questions: What do you want the person passing by your poster to do? Engage in a discussion about the content?

Learn enough to go off and want to try something for themselves? All the above, or none of the above but something else? Style your poster accordingly.

Sell Your Work in Ten Seconds Some conferences will present hundreds of posters; you will need to fight for attention. The first impressions of your poster, and to a lesser extent what you might say when standing in front of it, are crucial. The sad truth is that you have to sell your work.

how to write a research poster

One approach is to pose your work as addressing a decisive question, which you then address as best you can. Once you have posed the question, which may well also be the motivation for the study, the focus of your poster should be on addressing that question in a clear and concise way.

The Title Is Important The title is a good way to sell your work. It may be the only thing the conference attendee sees before they reach your poster.

The title should make them want to come and visit. The title might pose a decisive question, define the scope of the study, or hint at a new finding. Above all, the title should be short and comprehensible to a broad audience. The title is your equivalent of a newspaper headline—short, sharp, and compelling.

Poster Acceptance Means Nothing Do not take the acceptance of a poster as an endorsement of your work. Conferences need attendees to be financially viable.

Many attendees who are there on grants cannot justify attending a conference unless they present. There are a small number of speaking slots compared with attendees.

How to solve the dilemma? Enter posters; this way everyone can present. In other words, your poster has not been endorsed, just accepted. To get endorsement from your peers, do good science and present it well on the poster.

If the conference includes nonspecialists, cater to them. Just as the abstract of a paper needs to be a succinct summary of the motivation, hypothesis to be tested, major results, and conclusions, so does your poster.

A poster requires you to distill the work, yet not lose the message or the logical flow. Posters need to be viewed from a distance, but can take advantage of your presence. Posters can be used as a distribution medium for copies of associated papers, supplementary information, and other handouts.research onto my poster?

• Your poster is a short story • Describe a few major points • Arouse the readerʼs interest to read on • Limit it to words. Recite after me, Less is best! Simplify your paper into poster format Find out the size required! Whoʼs my audience? Often, researchers fail to recognize the unique nature of the format, which is a hybrid of a published paper and an oral presentation.

This methods note demonstrates how to design research posters to convey study objectives, methods, findings, and implications effectively to varied professional audiences. How to Write a Research Poster. By Lorrie Faith Cranor.

Poster sessions at conferences and university research fairs provide excellent opportunities for students to show off their work and to discuss their research in an informal setting.

Poster presentation formats differ from discipline to discipline, but in every case, a poster should clearly articulate what you did, how you did it, why you did it, and what it contributes to your field and the larger field of human knowledge. Unless the research is about methods, this should not be a major focus of your abstract (or your poster).

Succinctly state results, conclusions, and recommendations. This is what most people want to know. Home» our» poster» Research Posters. Poster Samples. Looking at samples of real student posters can help you generate ideas and define your goals.

As you get started, it may be helpful to look at examples of finished posters. Below are a number of sample posters created by UT undergraduates. There is a brief discussion of each poster.

How to Make a Scientific Poster (with Pictures) - wikiHow